Saturday, November 1st 2014

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Reeve recovery hopes boosted

Published: December 10, 2002 | Category: News

_38570933_reevechr300Scientists have uncovered evidence that actor Christopher Reeve could make a full recovery from paralysis if his spinal injury can be fixed.

Reeve, the star of the Superman films, was paralysed from the neck down after damaging his spinal cord in a riding fall seven years ago.

But doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, US, have discovered that his brain has maintained a near-normal ability to detect feeling and movement. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injuries often missed, mismanaged – In House

Published: November 8, 2002 | Category: Information

Despite a growing awareness of the association between automobile accidents and spinal cord injuries, a recent British study shows that nearly one in 10 such injuries is being missed in acute care settings.

Poonnoose and associates conducted a retrospective analysis of records for 569 patients who experienced neurologic deficits as a result of traumatic spinal cord injury. All were admitted to a specialized facility (directly from an emergency unit or from a referring hospital after acute care) for comprehensive management between April 1989 and April 1999. Most injuries were associated with traffic accidents or falls. Continue Reading »

Comparison of three wheelchair cushions for effectiveness of pressure relief.

Published: October 13, 2002 | Category: Information

This study compared the short-term pressure-relieving ability of the three most commonly prescribed wheelchair cushions (Roho, Jay, Pindot) for a person with SCI. The number of pressure sensors registering at the buttock-cushion interface during wheelchair sitting was measured by the Xsensor Pressure Mapping System after 5 min of sitting. An alternating treatments research design, with an initial baseline and a final treatment phase ending with the most effective cushion for relieving pressure, was used for the clinical evaluation. Measurements were compared using visual inspection and a Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Continue Reading »

First-ever guidelines for spinal cord injuries.

Published: October 9, 2002 | Category: Information

How spinal cord injuries (SCI) are managed–especially in the critical early stages–has a profound effect on a patient’s outcome. The publication of the first comprehensive SCI, treatment guidelines is an important step in standardizing evidence-based care.

Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) causes devastating neurologic Impairment that often leads to a lifetime of Disability. Each year, there are approximately 11,000 new SCI cases in the United States. (1) About 55% of SCIs occur among people between the ages of 16 and 30. (1) Continue Reading »

Spinal Cord: Heal Thyself

Published: August 29, 2002 | Category: News

Transplanted stem cells can improve Motor skills in injured rats

FRIDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDayNews) — Japanese researchers are reporting yet another advance in the repair of damaged body parts using fetal stem cells.

This one could be big because it involves spinal cords, experts say. Continue Reading »

Management of the spinal cord injured football player.

Published: August 16, 2002 | Category: Information

TIERNEY AND COLLEAGUES ASSESSED THE EFFECT OF head position and football equipment (helmet and shoulder pads) on cervical spinal cord space in subjects lying supine on a spine board. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 12 subjects were analyzed for sagittal space available for the cord (SAC), sagittal diameter of the spinal cord, and cervical-Thoracic angle. The MRI scans were evaluated midsagittally at each spinal level (C3-C7). The sagittal-diameter spinal canal and spinal cord measurements were taken at the midpoint of the vertebral body, and were traced manually. Continue Reading »

Laserpuncture is a New Treatment for SCI?

Published: July 11, 2002 | Category: Information

LASERPUNCTURE FOR SPINAL CORD INJURY

Laurance Johnston, Ph.D. Laserpuncture is generating much attention in France and other parts of Europe as an alternative medicine treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) and related physical disabilities. As the name implies, laserpuncture combines elements of acupuncture and laser therapy, both of which have shown potential for restoring some function after SCI. Albert Bohbot, a charismatic health professional, developed laserpuncture. Early in his career, he became interested in acupuncture’s potential for treating a variety of disorders. With the assistance of scientists at one of France’s leading engineering colleges, Bohbot developed a sophisticated electronic instrument that substituted an infrared laser light beam for acupuncture needles. Continue Reading »

Rover in Rehab

Published: April 17, 2002 | Category: Information

Therapy dogs work with SCI patients at University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers

Animal lovers know how comforting a pet can be. Health care providers now recognize that the unconditional love and companionship of a pet can have beneficial effects on the physical and psychological health of the people around them. Increasingly, therapy animals are being used in nursing homes, hospitals, and other therapeutic settings to encourage social interaction and reduce loneliness. At Harborview and the University of Washington Medical Center, therapy dogs have become regular members of the Rehabilitation staff. Continue Reading »

Benefit for paralyzed snowboarder takes off

Published: April 6, 2002 | Category: News

BRECKENRIDGE – On April 6, 2002, Matt Wyffels was competing at Copper Mountain and broke his back.

After suffering a spinal cord injury, doctors told Wyffels he’d never be able to use his legs again.

Wyffels resisted. Continue Reading »

The ‘sport’ of bioengineering

Published: January 15, 2002 | Category: Information

_1761268_rings300Yes, it is a picture of the Olympic rings, but the rings themselves are constructed out of living nerve cells.

This biological version of the icon of sporting excellence measures 3.4 millimetres – about one-eighth of an inch – across.

The “living rings”, as they have been dubbed, were produced by a graduate student at the University of Utah, Mike Manwaring. The state capital of Utah, Salt Lake City, is hosting the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. Continue Reading »